Archive for the ‘Photos’ Category

This is how the late artist Shigeo Fukuda described graphic art design. Whimsy was an important part of his creative spirit, and he sought to mesmerize if not downright confuse. Shadow art was part of his repertoire, as it is that of artists Kumi Yamashita, Larry Kagan and the studio of Tim Noble and Sue Webster. Just look at the amazing effects these artists get by casting light at the right angle on a variety of mediums from wire, found objects, and sculpture.

Larry Kagan, one of the shadow artists, muses that when the light is off , viewers think they’re simply looking at abstract art. When the light comes on, they laugh. Have you ever tried manipulating light and shadow in such ways? Akin to throwing shadow puppets on the wall, this takes it to an extraordinary level.

Astounding images aren’t they? An amazing amount of vision, imagination, time and patience must go into creating such artwork.

Jakob Wagner was born 1985 in Herdecke, Germany. He has since been living in Duesseldorf, where he has mainly been working as a freelance photographer, image editor and photo assistent. His work has taken him to many different countries around the world. When Jakob Wagner is not at work by assignment, he devotes much of his time and passion to his personal photography projects.

This famous photographer is doing a great work in nightscape photography. And his latest photoshoot called Nightscapes is not an exception. Though it may just seem like photography at night, the Jakob Wagner Nightscapes Collection utilizes special camera techniques coupled with a brilliant manipulation of lighting that paints a picture of these towns that hasn’t been seen before by the naked eye.

Cape town, South Africa

Cape town, South Africa

Arizona, USA

Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Lindau, Germany

Madeira, Portugal

Madeira, Portugal

Madeira, Portugal

Neustift,  Austria

Neustift,  Austria

California, USA

California, USA

Shanghai, China

Shanghai, China

Cape town, South Africa

Cape town, South Africa

Cape town, South Africa

Award-winning photographer Seth Casteel, also known as  ”The Underwater Dog Guy”, has been featured in “National Geographic”, “The New York Times”, “Time Magazine” and on “Good Morning America”, “Extra”, “CNN”, “World Report”, “The Today Show” and “Jeopardy”.  As one  of the most published pet photographer in the world, his work can be seen in hundreds of magazines, calendars, posters, books and TV show.

His passion for working with animals shines through in craftsmanship, whether he’s on location in Beverly Hills photoghraphing a pampered pooch or volunteering t the local shelter taking pictures of dogs and cats to help find them forever homes.

Our pets are our friends- our little friends! And they mean the world to us! Each of them has a unique and awesome personality, but it can be difficult to capture in a photograph.

Most of you probably haven’t been born when artist Scott Weaver started working on his incredibly complex kinetic toothpick sculpture, “Rolling through the Bay”, 35 years ago. The elaborate sculpture is comprised of multiple “tours” that move pingpong balls through neighborhoods, historical locations, and iconic symbols of San Francisco, all recreated with a little glue, some toothpicks, and an incredible amount of ingenuity. He admits that there are several toothpick sculptures even larger than his, but none has the unique kinetic components he’s constructed. Scott Weaver estimates he’s spent over 3,000 hours on the project.

I have used different brands of toothpicks depending on what I am building. I also have many friends and family members that collect toothpicks in their travels for me. For example, some of the trees in Golden Gate Park are made from toothpicks from Kenya, Morocco, Spain, West Germany and Italy. The heart inside the Palace of Fine Arts is made out of toothpicks people threw at our wedding.

For the better part of three decades canadian artist Guy Laramee has published a new series of his amazing book landscapes which are made by carving old books, dictionaries and encyclopedias. He calls his new project “Guan Yin” and dedicates it “to the mysterious forces thanks to which we can traverse ordeals”. Among his sculptural works are two incredible series of carved book landscapes and structures entitled “Biblios” and “The Great Wall”, where the dense pages of old books are excavated to reveal serene mountains, plateaus, and ancient structures. Of these works he says:

So I carve landscapes out of books and I paint Romantic landscapes. Mountains of disused knowledge return to what they really are: mountains. They erode a bit more and they become hills. Then they flatten and become fields where apparently nothing is happening. Piles of obsolete encyclopedias return to that which does not need to say anything, that which simply IS. Fogs and clouds erase everything we know, everything we think we are.